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This project started time ago, but once you start also learning a little bit more of it, you can have a bog picture of the hard efforts for all these group of people involve and putting their efforts together for the conservation of the Galapagos islands.

Scientist tags shark and whale shark, once done this they can monitoring and can give them real data base of their long distances journey they do. the results of this project for example can teach us they stay during certain of time from March to June for example in the case of the hammerhead sharks.

Did you know that a shark fin in the market can cost between 10-20 thousand dollars, in the mean while a live whale shark can cost around 5 millions dollars.

You can still be part of the solution and help to the conservation and support the efforts of many scientist.

Source and photo: Galapagos Conservancy

Shark Count is a user-friendly tool that allows divers visiting Galapagos to help monitor marine life in the Galapagos Marine Reserve.

Using Shark Count, divers become “citizen scientists” and make important contributions to our understanding of Galapagos marine ecosystems by recording the sharks, sea turtles, rays and ocean sunfish they encounter during their dives

The Shark Count app displays individual reports contributed from divers at the top 20 dive sites around the archipelago. Charts and maps show the number of species observed during each dive and the best sites and times to see each species.

All data is shared with the Galapagos National Park Directorate and will benefit research and management decisions focused on protecting the Reserve’s incredible marine life. 

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Juan Elaje

Juan Elaje

GALATRAILS FOUNDER

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